A Litter of Otter Pups at Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Otter pup at Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Photo by Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Three oriental small-clawed otter pups were born on January 8 at the Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, Australia.

The litter includes two females and one male. Keepers are seeking name suggestions for one of the pups via the zoo’s Facebook page.

“The pups have been in the den to date and we have been monitoring them via a video camera, to ensure they are growing and developing well, ” said keeper Ian Anderson. “Oriental small-clawed otters are a social species and live in large families so it is anticipated that the family will remain together for the near future.”

Otter pups at Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Photo by Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Baby Bottlenose Dolphin at Discovery Cove

Baby dolphin at Discovery Cove

A female bottlenose dolphin was born at Discovery Cove in Orlando, FL on February 7.  The calf now weighs about 20 kg (44 lbs.). She is doing well, nursing and bonding with her mother Coral.

Discovery Cove will soon host a naming contest on its Facebook page where fans can help choose the new baby dolphin’s name.

Learn more about dolphins at our bottlenose dolphin facts page.

Endangered Baby Gorilla at Busch Gardens

Western lowland gorilla

A western lowland gorilla named Mary with her new baby at Busch Gardens. Photo by Busch Gardens.

A female western lowland gorilla was born at Busch Gardens Tampa on February 6! This brings the gorilla troop at the Busch Gardens Myombe Reserve habitat to seven!

Western lowland gorilla

What a sweet face! Both mother and baby are doing well and are being monitored by the animal care staff. Photo by Busch Gardens.

“The first month will be the critical period as the mother, Mary, and the infant begin to integrate into the current gorilla troop, so the Busch Gardens animal care team will be monitoring their progress closely,” said Jeff Andrews, vice president of zoological operations for Busch Gardens.

Watch a video below of mama and baby!

 

Zoo Animals Get Special Treats on Valentine’s Day

Lorikeets at Nashville Zoo

These lorikeets enjoy new, Valentine’s Day-themed toys for the holiday. Photo by Christian Sperka / Nashville Zoo.

Are you celebrating Valentine’s Day tomorrow? The animals at Nashville Zoo will be enjoying the day with special enrichment items!

“Valentine’s Day is a chance for our animals to receive new items and toys for enrichment, and for our keepers to have a little fun, ” said Jac Menish, curator of behavioral husbandry at Nashville Zoo. “Cardboard in the shape of candy kisses, purple and red paper mache balls, and pink paper chains are just a few of the sweet items the animals will be enjoying during the day.”

Baby Alpaca Arrives at Nashville Zoo

Baby alpaca

Photo by Amiee Stubbs / Nashville Zoo.

On December 13, Nashville Zoo welcomed a baby alpaca into the world! The male calf, named Bandit, is the first baby alpaca to be born at the zoo.

“Based on the mother’s weight gain, we had predicted the baby would be born in spring, so his arrival on a December Saturday morning was quite a surprise,” said Kacie Cummings, Contact Area Supervisor. “We are thrilled that baby Bandit is healthy and on exhibit with the rest of our alpacas.”

The baby now weighs 14 pounds and stands at 2 feet tall. He will be on exhibit at Critter Encounters, an interactive area where guests can get up-close experiences with goats, camels, Galapagos tortoises, and birds, throughout the winter.

Baby alpaca

Photo by Amiee Stubbs / Nashville Zoo.

Alpacas are domesticated animals native to the mountains of South America.

Learn more at the Nashville Zoo website.

Baby Aardvark at Nebraska Zoo

The Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium in Omaha, Nebraska welcomed a baby aardvark on October 1. The little calf, who currently weighs around 12 pounds, is now on public display!

Baby aardvark

Photo by Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium.

When the little guy or gal (the baby’s gender is still unknown at this time) reaches adulthood, he or she will weigh anywhere from 110-150 pounds.

In the wild, aardvarks live throughout Africa, south of the Sahara. They have long, sticky tongues that help them catch termites and ants. Their long, tubular snouts help them reach into termite mounds.

Kangaroo Joeys at Nashville Zoo

Kangaroo joey peeking out from pouch

Photo by Aimee Stubbs / Nashville Zoo.

Kangaroo joeys are popping up left and right at Nashville Zoo! Up to six of the zoo’s nine female kangaroos are carrying joeys, and now many of the little ‘roos are old enough to peek out from their mothers’ pouches.

“We have been waiting with anticipation for a joey sighting since confirming the first pregnancy in April,” said Kacie Cummings, Contact Areas Supervisor. “Our joeys range in age from one month to six months, so getting the opportunity to see them at the different stages of development throughout the next year will be exciting for our guests.”

Kangaroo and joey

Photo by Aimee Stubbs / Nashville Zoo.

Learn more at the Nashville Zoo website.

Lion Cubs at Woodland Park Zoo

Three lion cubs

Three male lion cubs were born at Woodland Park Zoo. Photo by Photo by Dr. Darin Collins / Woodland Park Zoo.

Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, WA welcomed three male African lion cubs on October 24. Mother Adia and cubs are bonding and nursing well in an off-view maternity den. Zoo staff will monitor the newborn lions over the next several weeks to ensure their healthy development.

Watch a video of Adia and her cubs the day they were born:

In the wild, African lions inhabit the grasslands, shrub, and open woodlands of sub-Saharan Africa. They are considered vulnerable of extinction by the IUCN Red List. They are threatened by loss/fragmentation of habitat as well as disease. They are also killed by humans in bravery rituals, as hunting trophies, for medicinal powers, or by ranchers protecting their livestock. To learn more about lions, see our lion facts article.

Learn more about the lion cubs at Woodland Park Zoo at their blog.

Baby Francois Langur at Lincoln Park Zoo

Francois langur mother and baby

Just in time for Halloween, a Francois langur named Pumpkin gave birth to a bright orange baby. This is the fifth baby for mother Pumpkin and father Cartman.

“The newest Francois’ langur is healthy, nursing regularly and is showing signs of growth,” said Curator of Primates, Maureen Leahy. “Older sister Orla has already shown her support by alloparenting, a process in which the other female monkeys take turns carrying and providing care to the young.”

Although adult Francois langurs are distinguished by their black and white coloring, baby Francois langurs have an orange coat. Scientists believe this encourages alloparenting because the infants are easily identified. The orange fur fades to black after 3-6 months.

In the wild, Francois langurs inhabit southern Guangxi province of China, northern Vietnam and west-central Laos.

Learn more about the Francois langur baby at the Lincoln Park Zoo website.