Saved from the Spill on Nat Geo Wild


An oil impacted Brown pelican being cleaned at a Wildlife Rehabilitation center in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. (Photo Credit: USFWS/Greg Thompson)

National Geographic is once again at the forefront in documenting conservation efforts. This time their cameras turn to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

From National Geographic:

With oil actively gushing into the Gulf’s waters, National Geographic Explorer and wildlife expert Mireya Mayor, together with adventure underwater cameraman Andy Casagrande, join the extensive mission to save struggling creatures at the center of the crisis. Dive into the sludgy mess across the Gulf region with Mireya and Andy as they work to rescue pelicans, sea turtles, dolphins and many other creatures that use the Gulf as a migration superhighway. Along the way, they investigate the science behind the toxins and the anticipated impact they will have on coastal life for years to come. From the marshlands of Louisiana to the beaches and coral reefs of Florida — the beloved home state of both Mireya and Andy — watch their race to protect the injured creatures from an uncertain future, and follow their investigation after the oil spill was ultimately contained.

Tune into Nat Geo Wild on Tuesday, October 5 at 9pm ET/PT for Saved from the Spill.

Sea Turtle Hatchlings Enter Gulf Waters

Sea turtle hatchlings

Photo: Alabama Convention and Visitors Bureau

Seventy-three loggerhead sea turtles hatched at an Alabama beach Wednesday and entered the waters into the northern Gulf of Mexico.

For the past two months, scientists have deemed the Gulf of Mexico unsafe for sea turtle hatchlings due to BP’s catastrophic oil spill.  They have transported 28,000 eggs from Alabama and Panhandle beaches to Florida’s Atlantic coast.  After incubation at a Kennedy Space Center facility, the hatchlings were released into the Atlantic at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

However, after further examination of the Gulf waters, scientists have determined the northern Gulf of Mexico is now safe for sea turtles.

According to Dianne Ingram of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, “It was a good decision based on the best information we can get. It was more risky to ship them to Florida than it was to let them go straight into the water.”

The group of loggerhead hatchlings that entered the Gulf Wednesday was the first batch in Alabama allowed to enter their native waters.

For more information: AL.com.

Gulf Coast Oil Spill

Sea turtle surfaces in the Gulf Coast oil spill (Venice, Louisiana).

A sea turtle surfaces in the Gulf Coast oil spill (Venice, Louisiana).
Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nwfblogs/ / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

An accident last week has resulted in hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil being leaked into the ocean each day. The result will be devastating to the ecosystem of the Gulf Coast. Millions of plants and animals will be affected in the water and along the coast line.

Many people want to help, but it may not be the best idea to travel to the coast and start cleaning off animals. Proper training is required to know how to safely deal with the oil.

The Mother Nature Network has a good list of ways to help, including volunteering to rehabilitate affected animals and reporting areas where the oil can be seen from shore. To read their complete list and find the agencies to contact, please visit their website.