Koala Joey Makes Appearance at Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Koala joey

Say hello to Rosea, the baby koala who recently emerged from her mother’s pouch at the Taronga Western Plains Zoo. Photo by Natacha Richards, Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

At the Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, Australia, visitors got the first glimpse of a new fuzzy face! A female koala joey, named Rosea after a species of flowering eucalypt, emerged from her mother’s pouch.

“Rosea is approximately eight-months-old and is a little shy at present, preferring to stay close to mum’s chest but in the coming months will start to move on to her mother’s back,” said keeper Natacha Richards.

The zoo has two more koala joeys and many wallaby joeys that have yet to emerge from their mothers’ pouches.  So visitors to the zoo will have a lot to look forward to!

Koala joey

Photo by Jackie Stuart, Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Koala joey by Rachel Hanlon_3

Photo by Rachel Hanlon, Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Learn more about the koala joey at the Taronga Western Plains Zoo website.

For more information about koalas, see our koala facts article.

Otter Pups at Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Otter pup at Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Fuzzy face! Pictured above is one of the Oriental small-clawed otter pups born at Taronga Western Plains Zoo recently. Photo by Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, Australia welcomed two male Oriental small-clawed otter pups on January 24.

“The pups have been in the den to date and we have been monitoring them via a video camera, to ensure they are growing and developing well,” said Senior Keeper, Ian Anderson.

“Emiko and Pocket are being really attentive parents, we are really happy with their nurturing behaviours, as they are both first-time parents so it is a big learning curve for them.”

One of the otter pups is named Kali, which means “river” in Indonesian. You can suggest a name for the other pup on the Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s Facebook page!

Otter family

Photo by Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Otter family

Photo by Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Echidna Puggle Gets a Helping Hand

Echidna puggle

The team of vet nurses at Taronga Western Plains Zoo has been caring for this baby echidna for the past couple months. Photo by Taronga Conservation Society Australia.

The Taronga Western Plains Zoo in New South Wales, Australia has been hand rearing a baby echidna (called a puggle) over the last couple of months.

The little puggle was found at the side of the road. It is believed the mother was hit by a car.

“The puggle is now approximately four months old and responding very well under the watchful eye of the vet nurses,” said vet nurse, Jodie Milton.

“It’s feeding well and gaining weight steadily, so we’ll be able to wean it in about three to four months’ time and start introducing it to solid food.”

Normally, echidnas live in their mothers’ pouches for 2-3 months and then move into a secluded burrow for up to a year. So it is very rare to see an echidna puggle.

“It will be some time before the puggle will be able to fend for itself, but until then it’s in safe hands,” said Jodie.

For more information about the little puggle, see the Taronga Western Plains Zoo website.

Learn more about echidnas at our short-beaked echidna facts page.

Giraffe born at Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Giraffe calf
Mother Tulli and father Unami welcomed their new calf on Wednesday, June 19. The yet-to-be named calf is the seventh baby his mother has given birth to.

After only one hour the calf was on his feet and feeding. In one day he was on exhibit with the other giraffes. Talk about a fast grower!

For more, visit Taronga Zoo.
To learn more about giraffes, visit our Giraffe Fact page.

Remarkable White Rhino Birth at Taronga Western Plains Zoo

White rhino calf

The white rhino calf at one day old. Photo credit: Leonie Saville, Taronga Western Plains Zoo. See more photos below.

The Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, Australia celebrated the arrival of a healthy male white rhinoceros calf last week. The calf’s birth represents a major conservation achievement!

Said Senior White Rhino Keeper, Pascale Benoit, “Everyone is just over the moon with the arrival of the white rhino calf, especially given the tragic of the loss of four members of this herd to disease last year, and the plummeting numbers of all rhino species in the wild.

“This calf is not only an important birth for Taronga Western Plains Zoo, but for the species as a whole. Mopani [the new calf's mother] had never bred before so to produce an offspring has created a new genetic line and greater genetic diversity within the White Rhino population throughout Australasia.”

In Africa, wild white rhinos are threatened by poaching. Nearly 2000 rhinos have been slaughtered since 2006.

The baby white rhino, yet to be named, with mother Mopani. Photo credit: Leonie Saville, Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

The baby white rhino, yet to be named, with mother Mopani. Photo credit: Leonie Saville, Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

White rhino calf

Photo credit: Leonie Saville, Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

White rhino calf

Photo credit: Leonie Saville, Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Baby Bison Introduced at Australian Zoo

The Taronga Western Plains Zoo, located in Dubbo, New South Wales, Australia (400 km northwest of Sydney), recently announced the birth of a bison calf.  Born to parents Shashone and Cherokee Bob, the yet-to-be-named calf is healthy and growing strong.

Newborn bison calves have a reddish, light brown coat and lack the distinctive hump of the adult bison. They begin turning brown and developing the hump after a few months.

For more information about bison, see Animal Fact Guide’s article: American Bison.