SeaWorld’s Animal Rescue Team Saves Stranded Baby Dolphin

Rescued baby dolphin at SeaWorld

Preliminary tests have showed no major health issues in the newborn dolphin rescued on May 20, but to ensure the young animal gets the essential nutrients he needs, SeaWorld’s animal team has been manually tube-feeding the dolphin every two hours.

A newborn bottlenose dolphin was discovered stranded in shallow waters off of Three Sisters Island in Florida on Sunday.  SeaWorld’s animal rescue team, in conjunction with Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, transported the baby to SeaWorld’s facility in Orlando for medical testing and care.

Due to its size (just under 35 pounds), its upright dorsal fin, and its still-attached umbilical cord, SeaWorld‘s animal care experts believe the male dolphin to be no more than five days old.  Usually baby dolphins nurse from their mothers until they are 12-18 months old.  Animal care experts have been tube-feeding the youngster every two hours.

To learn more about bottlenose dolphins, see our Bottlenose Dolphin Facts Page.

Stolen Koala is Found

An elderly koala (13 years old) named Banjo was stolen from an Australian wildlife park on Tuesday. Thieves had broken into Banjo’s enclosure with bolt cutters. An anonymous phone call led authorities to a dumpster outside the wildlife park, where they found the frightened and dehydrated koala in a plastic bin covered with a crate.

According to Banjo’s keeper, Tim Faulkner, “It’s good to have him back. People can’t care for this sort of thing. It’s not a dog.”

Koalas are marsupials native to Australia who feed mainly on eucalyptus leaves. They generally live 10-15 years.

To learn more about Banjo, see:
Reuters
BBC
The Age

To learn more about koalas, see Animal Fact Guide’s article: Koala.

Get Involved: The Great Animal Rescue Chase

Deer rescueDid you know that there are animal rescue opportunities all around you?  From helping a turtle cross the road to taking in a stray cat to calling a wildlife rehabilitator to save an injured bird, there are actions great and small that you can take to help animals.  And a new online community wants to hear about it!  The Great Animal Rescue Chase is a website that celebrates the heroes that make an effort to rescue animals.

It’s free to register, so if you already have an animal rescue story to share, visit the site and get started.  If you’ve never rescued an animal but would like to get involved, this website is for you too!  You can read the rescuer’s code, which is a set of basic guidelines for interacting with wild animals, and you can learn from an international community of animal lovers.  There are amazing, heartwarming animal rescue stories that will inspire you to take action in your own neighborhood.

Here’s one story posted on the Great Animal Rescue Chase from Sarah Goodwin-Nguyen in Florida about rescuing a hawk who was stuck in a chain link fence:

Hawk stuck in fenceThis broad-winged hawk got himself in quite a predicament! My guess is he was after a rodent and got stuck. Luckily, the homeowners came to the Key West Wildlife Center for help. I followed them home and managed to squeeze myself between the fences to get a safe hold of the terrified hawk. Those talons and that beak are no joke, and he could’ve caused some serious injury to anyone who doesn’t know how to handle raptors.

At first, I was unable to dislodge him he was wedged in so deep. The very concerned homeowners agreed to sacrifice their fence and, with the help of a neighbor’s bolt cutters, we cut the hawk out to great cheers! The hawk was miraculously uninjured. I took him back to the Center to evaluate, gave him some fluids and a good night’s rest, and the hawk was released successfully the very next day.

My favorite thing about this rescue was how the homeowners and the neighbors got involved, taking time out from their busy days and putting their concern for this magnificent bird ahead of the cost of repairing the fence.

To read more inspirational stories and to get involved with the worldwide animal rescue effort, visit the Great Animal Rescue Chase website.

Little Elephant Rescued from Ditch

A young Asian elephant, around 4-5 years old, fell into a ditch while crossing a tea plantation in northern India with the rest of his herd.  His mother and other elephants in the herd tried to help him out, but to no avail.  Local people, forest rangers, and an animal welfare volunteer stepped in to help using a mechanical digger.  Because the volunteers widened the ditch, the elephant was able to flip onto his side and stand up by himself.  He then rejoined his mother and the herd.

Watch the rescue here:

Wounded Swan Gets Second Chance

In Grantsburg, Wisconsin, a hunter came across a tagged trumpeter swan who was suffering from two gunshot wounds.  Locals who were familiar with the swan (tagged 88F) and his mate managed to capture the injured swan and bring him to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota in Roseville.

After 10 days of treatment, the swan grew strong and healthy, and WRCMN volunteers released 88F back into the Grantsburg wildlife area.

But his mate was nowhere to be found.

A few weeks later,  88F was sighted in Hudson, Wisconsin, 60 miles south of where he’d been released!  Swimming alongside him was his lifetime mate.  They had reunited at their wintering site.

Trumpeter swans are native to the United States and Canada. It is illegal to hunt trumpeter swans in the US because they are federally protected.

For more information about 88F, see:

TwinCities.com Pioneer Press
Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota

Wildlife Saving

Wildlife Saving is an organization for children which offers the opportunity to sponsor an animal. The organization has several animals at various wildlife centers around the world that can be sponsored.  Each animal has information provided for those who donate. This includes photos and videos of the animal and blog posts from the animals caretakers.

The site requires registration to donate to an animal. To make this safe for children, they comply with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.  Parental permission is also required for children to register. They also keep donation prices quite low, from 4 dollars to sponsor for 3 months to 13 dollars for a year.

To learn more, visit their site WildlifeSaving.org.

Harbor Seal Makes Trek to Trout Hatchery; Has Feast

Harbor seal in Cape Cod

A young harbor seal was discovered in a state fish hatchery in the town of Sandwich in Cape Cod.  There she had her pick of delicious trout to eat.  Her all-you-can eat buffet came to an end, however, when the Cape Cod Stranding Network captured the seal, tagged her, and released her back into the Atlantic in West Dennis.

What is interesting is the tremendous journey this seal had to make to reach the hatchery.  According to Misty Niemeyer of the Cape Cod Stranding Network, the seal would have had to waddle on land for 2 miles, including stretches on the boardwalk and through a tunnel under Route 6A.

For more information, see Boston.com’s article: “Hungry Seal Hits Bonanza at Fish Hatchery”

Stranded Pilot Whale Rescue a Success

Pilot whale rescue in Tasmania, Australia

Over the weekend, 64 pilot whales were stranded on the northern coast of Tasmania.  In general, it is rare to save any whales in a mass stranding such as this one, however, rescuers were able to release 11 of the whales back into the water.

Rescuers aren’t certain why the pilot whales got stranded, but scientist Rosemary Gales offered this theory:

“At Godfrey’s Beach where we are, it is very shallow and sloping. It has an extraordinary tide span and so the whales one minute can be in quite deep water and as soon as the tide changes, they get caught out and they are stranded essentially on sand bars and very shallow sloping beach.”

The scientists attached satellites to the ones who were released and have determined that the whales have regrouped into a small pod, thereby making the rescue a success.

For more info:
The Telegraph – “Australian rescuers save some of the stranded pilot whales”
The World Today – “Scientists monitor whales after beaching”